We started the day like all other days, in the Lawson convenience store to grab two tamago sandos (egg salad sandwiches - SO good!) and onigiri. It was the perfect breakfast. We spent the afternoon exploring Hama-rikyu Gardens which used to be an old villa.

In the middle of the pond, there is a tea house where we enjoyed matcha paired with Japanese confections (called wagashi) in a traditional Japanese tea ceremony style. They weren't strict, knowing that we were tourists, and they were extremely helpful when it came to the etiquette. Even the other guests that were Japanese were willing to show us how to properly participate in the ceremony.

It was a long day of walking around, but it was perfect to relax with matcha for a little. After, we found a bench on a hill, overlooking to gardens and the city, and we closed our eyes for a little while under the sun. 

After the garden, we made our way to a museum called Intermediatheque. We weren't allowed to take photos in there sadly. I would have loved to share photos because it was so cool! The space used to be the old post office, and now showcases natural history specimen beautifully. The website describes the museum's purpose with a bit of broken English, but it makes sense: "The design policy conducting the revival of this historical heritage within the contemporary urban cityscape is one of the highlights of the exhibition." By re-purposing the old post office space to show off natural history specimen that are important for research, within a city setting is incredible. You can see some photos here.

From there, we walked through Ginza, a really nice neighborhood in Tokyo. For dinner, we went to Tokyo Ramen Street within Tokyo station. While there are a few ramen shops in this cluster that are well-loved, all of the ramen spots here looked good. After walking around all day, we were hungry and chose not to wait in line at the two most well-known shops. We took a chance at another ramen shop that didn't have a wait, but every other table was full. We chose our ramen bowls at a machine and paid there. When we sat down, we gave our tickets to the server and shortly after, the ramen we selected was at our table. It was comforting and delicious. 















We started the day like all other days, in the Lawson convenience store to grab two tamago sandos (egg salad sandwiches - SO good!) and onigiri. It was the perfect breakfast. We spent the afternoon exploring Hama-rikyu Gardens which used to be an old villa.

In the middle of the pond, there is a tea house where we enjoyed matcha paired with Japanese confections (called wagashi) in a traditional Japanese tea ceremony style. They weren't strict, knowing that we were tourists, and they were extremely helpful when it came to the etiquette. Even the other guests that were Japanese were willing to show us how to properly participate in the ceremony.

It was a long day of walking around, but it was perfect to relax with matcha for a little. After, we found a bench on a hill, overlooking to gardens and the city, and we closed our eyes for a little while under the sun. 

After the garden, we made our way to a museum called Intermediatheque. We weren't allowed to take photos in there sadly. I would have loved to share photos because it was so cool! The space used to be the old post office, and now showcases natural history specimen beautifully. The website describes the museum's purpose with a bit of broken English, but it makes sense: "The design policy conducting the revival of this historical heritage within the contemporary urban cityscape is one of the highlights of the exhibition." By re-purposing the old post office space to show off natural history specimen that are important for research, within a city setting is incredible. You can see some photos here.

From there, we walked through Ginza, a really nice neighborhood in Tokyo. For dinner, we went to Tokyo Ramen Street within Tokyo station. While there are a few ramen shops in this cluster that are well-loved, all of the ramen spots here looked good. After walking around all day, we were hungry and chose not to wait in line at the two most well-known shops. We took a chance at another ramen shop that didn't have a wait, but every other table was full. We chose our ramen bowls at a machine and paid there. When we sat down, we gave our tickets to the server and shortly after, the ramen we selected was at our table. It was comforting and delicious. 

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